Organizational management

Organizational management
1. You are the City Manager of City A. You have learned that 20% of your anticipated revenues will not be realized. You have called a meeting of your Department Directors to address the shortfall and propose an action plan. Your action plan should:
a. Articulate the challenges that the City is facing and specify financial, human resource, managerial, and political objectives.
b. Propose a detailed strategy to address the shortfall. Include explanations for your choices.
c. Address how your team will communicate with staff to lead the organization through the challenges.
d. Address how your strategy will address city council members and the public.
2. Select a specific problem in a policy area with which you are familiar. You are a policy analyst for a government entity (identify the entity) and you have been asked to review the policy issue comprehensively and create a report for your elected representatives.
a. Outline the policy issue as it impacts your governmental entity. Briefly review the social, political, and economic context of the policy.
b. Propose two policy instruments (alternatives) that might be used to address the issue. Additionally, include an alternative of doing nothing.
c. Provide a realistic assessment of the anticipated outcomes, including potential unintended consequences resulting from applying each policy alternative, including issues of policy development, policy networks, and/or policy implementation for each alternative.
d. Address how you would evaluate the results of each policy alternative.
3. You are the Director of the Workforce Development Center of County C. Recently, the County Administrator informed you that your center’s Career Transition Training Program is subject to a 40% budget cut in response to State statistics that report the unemployment rate has dropped from 15% to 8% last year. You know that the county continues to be seriously affected by the economic downturn. It is experiencing a slow recovery and you believe the number of unemployed in the county is still very high. To support the program, you decide to collect evidence for analysis and presentation to the Board of Supervisors.
Propose a research and analysis plan. Your plan should:
a. Articulate the problem and analyze the stakeholders and their interests in the situation,
b. Identify alternative explanations to the statistical change in unemployment,
c. Propose research to collect appropriate data to resolve the potential discrepancy. Specify your research purpose, your research methodology what data will be collected and why this data is more appropriate,
d. Explain how your research results will guide policy action.
4. You have worked as a public manager for over twenty years. Despite career ups and downs, you are proud of your service and have been recognized by your family and your community. Recently your nephew, who graduated with a business major, came to you for advice about a career in the public sector. Your nephew particularly wants to know:
a. How is management in the public sector different from the private sector?
b. What are the unique responsibilities and dilemmas of public service professionals?
c. What motivates you to work in the public sector and how do you keep motivated over the long term despite organizational and political challenges?
d. What are some typical ethical issues in the public sector? What guides your response to ethical challenges?
5. You are the City Manager of City A. This morning your secretary brought to your attention that last night a young black female employee in your organization posted a YouTube video accusing one of your senior staff of racial discrimination against her over the past several years. Overnight, the video received over 10,000 hits and downloads. Those commenting on the video included city employees in your organization, citizens in City A, and people around the world. A union representative, a reporter, and a council member have left messages. Prepare an action plan to respond to this situation. Your action plan should:
a. Identify the legal, managerial and political issues involved in the situation and identify relevant laws, policies and management guidelines related to the issue,
b. Discuss how you will communicate with the employees involved and others in the organization,
c. Discuss how you will respond to the public, elected officials, and the media,
d. Propose actions to take in the immediate term (within the next few hours), in the midterm (over the next month) and the long term (over the next two years).

The Racial Laws in Italy during WW2

The Racial Laws in Italy during WW2
In strengthening Italy’s bond with Nazi Germany Mussolini, in September 1938, passed The Racial Laws against the Jews, barring them from studying or teaching in a school of higher learning and revoking the citizenship of all foreign Jews obtained after January, 1919, and decreeing their expulsion within six months. In November, further discriminatory legislation were passed, including the prohibition of marriages between Jews and Aryans and the exclusion of Jews from military and civil administrative positions. The Manifesto, which was closely modeled on the Nazi Nuremberg laws, laid the foundations for Mussolini’s racial policies.
Some historians have tried to absolve Italians from their role in the Holocaust, explaining that while Italy did institute racial laws, the extermination campaign was strictly a German invention. Those historians fail to take account of the impact of Italy’s 1938 racial laws, which instituted harsher restrictions than Germany’s first anti-Semitic legislation. Historian Meir Michaelis wrote in “Mussolini and the Jews,” that although Mussolini “was too much of an Italian to approve of the ‘final solution,’ . . . he and his henchmen helped to create the conditions in which the Holocaust became possible.” While Mussolini did not put Italian forces to work to implement the “Final Solution,” he had legally isolated Italian Jews to strengthen the Rome-Berlin axis. When considering the record of the Italian people, it is important to remember that Mussolini was a popular leader and fascism was a popular movement. When the racial laws were passed, the most common reaction among Italians was one of indifference, not outrage.
That said, the racial campaign also failed to sway most Italians to anti-Semitism. While the most assimilated Jewish community in Europe was betrayed by its government, it found that many Italians remembered their past service to the nation, viewed them as no different than their Catholic neighbors, and stood by their Jewish countrymen.
It is, therefore, my premise that while some of the racial laws were indeed harsher than those in Germany there was a serious lack of desire to enforce these laws by the Italian populace and authority. To what extent is it fair to argue that Italy implemented antisemitic legislation–especially in a comparative context with Germany’s application of similar legislation?
Calling on the scholarship listed below, and without absolving Italy of its national responsibility for collaboration with the Nazi regime, in this paper I will argue that Italy should not be perceived as having practiced the discrimination it articulated on paper.
TEXTS
• Meir Michaelis, Mussolini and the Jews
• Article by Liliana Picciotto; http://www.primolevicenter.org/Essays%26Interviews/Entries/2012/8/13_The_Vatican_and_the_Anti-Jewish_Persecution_in_Italy_through_Diplomatic_Documents_of_the_Holy_See.html
• Iael Orvieto’s “Letters to Mussolini: Italian Jews and the Racial Laws” in Remember for the future; The Holocaust in an Age of Genocide,
• “Italians Jews Facing Racial Laws: Appeal to Mussolini as a Wayy of Coping in Yalkut Moreshet (vol 72, April 2002)
• De Felice, Renzo. The Jews in Fascist Italy: A History. New York: Enigma Books, 2001.
• Sarfatti, Michele. The Jews in Mussolini’s Italy: From Equality to Persecution. George L. Mosse series in modern European cultural and intellectual history. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2006.
• Zuccotti, Susan. The Italians and the Holocaust: Persecution, Rescue, and Survival. New York: Basic Books, 1987.
• Jews in Italy Under Fascist and Nazi Rule, 1922-1945 edited by Joshua D. Zimmerman
THIS PAPER NEEDS TO USE THE CHICAGO STYLE OF REFERENCING
Here is a link to the only acceptable style of referencing: http://www.ucd.ie/t4cms/Guide68.pdf

Interview Health Care Professional

Interview Health Care Professional
1) Interview a health care leader about a new technology he or she selected, planned for, and implemented.
2) Write a paper of 1,000–1,200 words, from your perspective, on how that process occurred, what happened, what the leader would do again, and what mistakes he or she may have made.
3) Refer to the assigned readings to incorporate specific examples and details into your paper.
4) Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.
1. Definition, Structure, Content, Use and Impacts of Electronic Health Records: A Review of the Research Literature
Read “Definition, Structure, Content, Use and Impacts of Electronic Health Records: A Review of the Research Literature” by Häyrinen, Saranto, and Nykänen, from the International Journal of Medical Informatics (2008).
http://library.gcu.edu:2048/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2007.09.001
2. The Barriers to Electronic Medical Record Systems and How To Overcome Them
Read “The Barriers to Electronic Medical Record Systems and How To Overcome Them” by McDonald, from the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (1997).
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC61236/
The Impact of Technology on Clinical and IT Systems
Introduction
One of the factors driving change in the health care delivery system is the rapidly evolving technology that emerges from research and development. Emerging technologies create rapid and profound change in the delivery system and may have drastic financial impacts. However, adapting new technologies without a clear understanding of what they can do for and to the system is never a good idea. They must be evaluated for their abilities to enhance the quality of care, along with their capacity to drive new revenue in a procedure-based delivery system. Finally, the cost of new technology is highly correlated with how new it is, and whether it is a stand-alone product with no competition. All of these factors combine to make it essential to do careful business and clinical analyses prior to committing to even the most appealing new technology.
In this module, we will examine two types of new technology: clinical applications and the electronic medical record (EMR).
Clinical Technology
In the realm of clinical technology, there are numerous subgroups. In selected subgroups, we will explore examples of new technology that is in the research and development pipeline.
Cardiovascular
The underlying theme of technology in cardiovascular care is the shift from significantly invasive approaches, such as open cardiac bypass surgery requiring a split sterna surgical approach and the use of a heart lung machine to maintain the patient during surgery, toward minimally invasive or noninvasive techniques. Ultra-wide band radar devices allow the measurement of cardiac output, heart rate, heart rhythm, and patterns of blood flow without any invasion of the body. The device is roughly the size of a deck of cards and can be worn in a shirt pocket without leads or monitor pads. The use of this type of radar-based approach allows noninvasive monitoring without pain or limitation of movement by patients.
Another cardiovascular application is the use of bio-absorbable, drug-eluting stents to open coronary arteries. The old technology required a surgical intervention that involved removing an artery from another part of the body and suturing it to the blocked coronary artery to provide a bridge for blood to flow past the blockage. This generally required hours in the operating room, with a patient on a heart bypass machine, and several days to a week in the intensive care unit after surgery. This has been largely replaced by placing stents or coils in the coronary arteries to hold them open. This is done in the cardiac catheterization lab under sedation or light anesthesia and is accomplished by threading a catheter through the arm or leg vein up to the heart and into the artery. However, historically these types of stents could block up again. The newest technology involves placing a bio-absorbable stent that eventually melts into the arterial wall, along with the drug-eluting aspect, which prevents clot formation. While this is a significant improvement from the patient’s perspective, it also comes with a steep premium in cost, at least initially. Cardiac services have traditionally been among the most lucrative services for hospitals and physicians. However, the shift of services from inpatient to outpatient and the marked reductions expected in cardiac surgical volume result in a noticeable decline in patient admission days and overall cardiac revenue for the average hospital. Cardiac surgeons across the country are indicating decreases in volume of 20% to 30% in their patient load.
A brand new emerging technology is autologous cell therapy, in which a patient’s own heart muscle cells are cultured from their own adult stem cells and then placed back into the patient’s heart muscle. This process is in clinical trials at present, and if it works as expected, patients will have strengthened heart muscle without the fears of tissue rejection from organ transplants. It will also reduce the need for electromechanical pumps or a full heart transplant. This technology could potentially revolutionize cardiac health care.
Oncologic
With the growing rate of cancer diagnoses, oncologic care is an area rife with new technology. One new area with great promise is the use of radioactive trace markers to measure the effects of chemotherapy or radiation on tumor growth. Fluorothymidine is being studied as an imaging probe that measures tumor cell proliferation and response to therapies. The ability to do an early assessment of tumor growth and development should provide better outcomes for patients with cancer and reduced expenses from ineffective therapies.
Another new technology overcomes the problem of the blood-brain barrier, which prevents chemotherapeutic agents from penetrating the brain. The new technology, acoustic-enhanced drug delivery, uses focused ultrasound to reverse the blocking effects of the blood-brain barrier by agitating the brain tissue to enhance its permeability. This also improves the tumor’s uptake of the drug, with a quicker and more effective response to the chemotherapy.
Gastrointestinal (GI)
Digestive disorders have been diagnosed for years through endoscopy. However, this process requires sedation of the patient. Video capsule technology appeared in 2001, but its diagnostic capability was limited, since the capsule’s movement was not controllable. The newest technology is a robotic capsule that allows the physician to control the movement and orientation of the capsule for better visualization of the GI tract. Once the capsule is positioned properly, it can perform a robotic biopsy or administer a treatment to a specific area with a noninvasive approach.
Diagnostic Imaging
There are numerous technologies that are emerging in the field of diagnostic imaging. Over the last five years, computed tomography (CT) scans have become three dimensional and capable of imaging thinner slices, giving much greater visual resolution. However, increases in CT imaging have prompted rising concerns about radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which creates images through a magnetic field, is a safer option when radiation exposure is a concern. MRIs can also visualize soft tissue in a way that CT scans cannot. A new technology based on the MRI platform is MRI-guided radiation therapy for tumors. In this approach, the MRI imaging system is combined with three gamma ray sources, which function together as a large robot. The patient is positioned between two magnets, and the gamma ray sources rotate around the patient. The higher imaging resolution and real-time visualization of the tumor’s shape and location can allow careful coordination of the three beams, protecting healthy tissue for more effective therapy.
These are all examples of clinical technology that are currently being tested and developed. The issues of whether, how, and when to implement new technology depend upon where one wishes to be on the new technology adoption curve. Those who invest early in the process, the “early adopters,” may be able to carve out a market and attract new physicians and patients to the new technology and its early promise. The downside is that the new product is generally very costly, especially if it is one of a kind. Early adoption also may not provide enough time in operation to clearly understand the pros and cons of the new technology. The second phase of adoption, defined as the “early majority,” involves the emergence of competing vendors that have developed their own versions of the technology. This facilitates wider utilization and more competitive pricing. Differences in the new technology also emerge, offering more options for use. However, an early adopter may have already seized market share, making it harder to attract new business. The third phase, the “late majority,” adopt the technology before it becomes obsolete but after it has been thoroughly tested in the market and has become the standard of care. At this point, there are little distinguishing characteristics between vendors, so that price and standardization become the determining factors.
The assessment and evaluation of a new technology always requires a strategic review, a financial analysis, and a carefully done and accurate business plan.
· First, how does the new technology fit into the organization’s strategic plan? Will it enhance the achievement of specified goals? What physicians will be stakeholders and users of the new technology? How will it fit with other technology and competing demands for capital resources?
· Second, what does the financial analysis show? What increase in volume is anticipated? What is the potential payor mix? What types of reimbursement are available? Will it add costs for patients on a diagnosis-related group reimbursement plan? What is the contribution margin once the initial capital expenditure is covered, and what is the time frame for a return on investment?
· Third, what does the business plan reveal? Will it attract new physicians and more patients, and from where? Will it enhance elective procedure volume? What is the competitive advantage it brings, or what possible loss of business would it prevent? What market share of the affected patient population is anticipated?
A word of caution: beware of vendors that offer to provide a business and financial analysis to “relieve you of the workload.” It is generally not wise to rely on vendor-provided analyses without strong validation of their assumptions from your own internal resources. The wise administrator always does his or her own analysis and review, looking at the new technology with a critical and analytical eye and resisting the temptation to acquire it just because it is new.
The EMR
The Healthcare Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 mandates that hospitals and health care entities move to an EMR by 2015. While many hospitals have components of an EMR, not many have the full package implemented and in place, which includes the clinical documentation and the computerized physician order entry modules. There are a large number of vendors competing for the business, and the selection of an EMR product is very difficult.
When preparing for the move to an EMR, there are several steps to take:
1. Develop clear criteria for success. What does your organization expect the EMR to accomplish for you? How will you know if that is achieved once you implement it? How much of the health care continuum will be included in your EMR (physician offices, hospital entities, outpatient services, etc.)? Many organizations may develop an EMR with the belief that it will save staff time and result in fewer positions and staff costs. In fact, the opposite has been shown to be true. Most EMR implementations take more time than paper and pencil approaches for the data entry. The value of an EMR may well be in its ability to translate data into workable information via reports. If you want to know the number of foley catheters that are in patients for more than two days, a good EMR can generate a report for you. Be sure that your criteria for success are achievable, measurable, and make strategic sense for your organization. Representatives of all stakeholder groups should be involved in developing these criteria.
2. Use due diligence in selecting your product and vendor. This is a hotly competitive market among vendors of various EMR software products. The vendors will promise a great deal in order to make the final cut and selection. It is essential that you thoroughly evaluate the abilities of each product as it fits your strategic goals, your criteria for success, operations in each affected department, functionality, reporting capability, ease of use, and robustness of the product. A smart way to proceed is to sit through the vendor presentations, take careful notes, and then go talk to hospitals that have used that vendor’s product. You need to understand how the product will be used and whether all the components and departments that will use it are integrated (built into the original software platform) or interfaced (requires the build of a software bridge between computer systems). An EMR that does not have an integral surgical suite package would be at a significant disadvantage in the competitive world, for example.
3. Learn from other hospitals that use the software platform you are considering. You cannot go to too many hospitals to see an EMR in action. It is a mistake to go to only one or two and think that you have seen it all. Multiple visits will show multiple different ways to use the system and the problems that come with it. If you visit, talk to the users in the departments about their feelings regarding the system, how easy it is to use, how it changed their work flow and operations, and what issues they see with it. These visits can help you avoid a very expensive mistake. Having said that, keep in mind that there is no perfect system and that these systems are extremely complex. It is unrealistic to believe the vendor when they tell you that it will be a smooth and organized implementation with no problems, because there are always problems. The vendor’s commitment to help and support during and after the implementation is critical to success.
4. Above all, do not leave any stakeholder group out of the selection and design, especially physicians. Many physicians look with skepticism on the advent of an EMR, and some have likely had less than great experiences with it at other hospitals or in their own practices. It is absolutely imperative that physicians and other key stakeholders, such as staff, are deeply involved in the selection, design, implementation, and monitoring of the EMR system and associated processes. Failure to do this step almost always guarantees a less than optimal result and generally results in a complete failure.
5. Budget appropriately. The wise health care executive will realize up front that the selection, design, and implementation of an EMR will cost millions of dollars. The software costs alone can run that much, and then one must plan for the hardware costs, data storage expenses, and data entry systems/computers. In addition, the planning and design teams can take months to a year to complete all the implementation planning, and the staff costs for participation can run into high six figure amounts. It is always a good idea to ask the hospitals where you are observing their usage to tell you what their total EMR costs were, at least in ballpark figures.
The EMR requires a huge amount of resource commitment in planning, selection, due diligence, implementation, and ongoing monitoring. This is one of the decisions and change processes that must go correctly, since so much is at stake.
Conclusion
New technology has had, and will continue to have, lasting impacts on the health care delivery system and its individual providers and components. Clinical technology continues to pour out of the research and development pipeline, and new drugs, new procedures, and new therapies will be a part of the health care landscape for decades to come. It is new, exciting, and very expensive. Careful analysis and evaluation is an essential part of selecting what is useful and appropriate for a health care entity and avoiding the high cost flash in the pan that does not me

Overview Of Assignment: Hypocrisy and Behavior Change

Overview Of Assignment: Hypocrisy and Behavior Change
The research in the textbook shows a number of ways in which dissonance causes people to rationalize or justify discrepant behavior. Whereas rationalization can prevent people from learning from their mistakes, dissonance can also be used to motivate people to make changes that benefit them and society (i.e., pro-social behavior). An example of this can be found in the research on using hypocrisy to induce dissonance and behavior change.
To prepare for this assignment:
• Read the paper by Stone and colleagues (1994), paying particular attention to the use of hypocrisy and cognitive dissonance to motivate people to practice safe sex.
• Think of the hypocrisy paradigm, pay particular attention to how you would define and explain it, and consider ways that dissonance in hypocrisy differs from dissonance in an induced compliance paradigm.
• Think about how researchers test the effect of hypocrisy on behavior and how it can be measured.
• Consider the limitations in the Stone, et al., study and think about how you might avoid them.
• Then think about designing an induction of hypocrisy that would motivate people to use sunscreen.
The assignment (2 pages): No Plagiarism, APA style format and must cited with references provided.**All 4 Questions must answered fully for proper grading by Professor.
(1).Briefly define and explain the hypocrisy paradigm. How does the dissonance in hypocrisy differ from the dissonance in the induced compliance paradigm? Why do the researchers predict that hypocrisy motivates people to change their behavior rather than their attitudes?
(2).Explain how the researchers tested the effect of hypocrisy on behavior change in this study. Specifically, describe who the subjects were, what they did in each condition of the study, and how behavior change was measured. Summarize the results of the study.
(3)Assess and explain the problems you see with the study and the conclusions drawn by the researchers. Describe two limitations to the study and explain how they impact the results.
(4).Design an induction of hypocrisy to motivate people to use sunscreen more often when they spend time in the sun. Describe who the target individuals would be and then explain how you would get them to make a public commitment to the use of sunscreen and how you would make them mindful of past failures to use sunscreen. Finally, explain how you would measure their motivation to reduce dissonance by changing their behavior.
Support your Assignment with specific references to all resources used in its preparation.
*****Assignment and Writing Rubric
There are three primary quality indicators for this assignment. All written assignments will be graded using these three indicators (Responsiveness, Content,
and Quality).
RESOURCES:
Course Text: Persuasion: Psychological Insights and Perspectives
Chapter 4, “Actions and Attitudes” (pp. 63–79)
Article: Stone, J., Aronson, E., Crain, A. L., Winslow, M. P., & Fried, C. B. (1994). Inducing hypocrisy as a means of encouraging young adults to use condoms. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 20(1), 116–128. Available here.

Multiple Relationships in Psychotherapy

Multiple Relationships in Psychotherapy
Individual Assignment
Answer the following five questions, each of which has 20 marks, for a total of 100. The answer to each question should be no longer than 150 words. Your answers need to be consistent across the five questions, so once you have identified a strategy in question 1, please do not change this in subsequent answers, or you will be penalised. If possible, draw (and explain) a suitable figure or diagram for questions 1, 2 and 3.
1. Assuming you are a senior manager of the parent firm, below, in which cell of the integration/ responsiveness (I/R) framework would you place the corporate strategy of each of the following five MNEs:
a) IBM
b) Toyota
c) Huawei
d) Samsung Electronics
e) Google
2. What is the appropriate organisational structure consistent with the strategy of each of the five firms in Question 1?
3. For each of the five firms, discuss any flagship relationships which may exist with its network partners (here make plausible arguments, even if you have no specific data).
4. What is the appropriate corporate culture to achieve satisfactory corporate social responsibility and ethical behaviour consistent with the strategy you discuss in Question 1, for each of the five firms? Again, make plausible arguments, whenever possible bolstered by publicly available corporate data.
5. Now assume that you are a subsidiary manager. Explain how you are implementing the strategies for each of these five firms, consistent with your answer to Question 1.
Format:
We recommend that Notes or Endnotes should be used only if absolutely necessary and must be identified in the text by consecutive numbers, enclosed in square brackets and listed at the end of the essay.
The general format of this submission should include the following parts:
Front page: assignment title, your name, your student ID number, your group, your team, and word count (word count excludes the front page, appendices, tables, figures, and references).
Introduction: a brief explanation of the main objective of this assignment.
Main body: You need to show that you are capable of applying frameworks to the firms you are studying. A good piece of work for this module should focus on a persuasive analysis and argument, critical thinking , logical reasoning and clear presentation. The format is to provide the answer to each question.
Conclusion: a brief summary of the essential arguments/findings for the assignment.
Tables and figures: It is your decision to put the figures/tables separately or in the text. Each figure/table needs to be fully referenced and explained. Please do not insert any of them without explanation.
References: All sources (e.g. books, articles, internet sites) used in the essay must be listed in a reference.
Appendices (if any)

Team Strategy Plan

Team Strategy Plan
You are part of a group of newly hired team superintendents with Riordan Manufacturing. Your group was hired to lead new teams and begin production of the newly designed CardiCare Valve heart valves. This will be at the organization’s Pontiac, MI, location that is currently manufacturing custom plastic parts. Many of the production employees are current employees from other divisions, and the company expects to hire some new employees.
Resources: Riordan Manufacturing Virtual Organization, and University of Phoenix Material: Team Strategy Plan found on the student website.
To find the Virtual Organization go to Materials section and then under Course Outline you will find Virtual Organization Link. At the top of the website you will see Business, Education, Healthcare, etc. Select Business then in the drop down select Riordan. In the upper right corner select Intranet. You will then find all the necessary areas: Demographics, Employees etc.
Review the Riordan Manufacturing intranet site and the Human Resource section under Demographics, Employees, Employee Files, and Reports.
(1). Prepare a plan to create the teams and fill out the Team Strategy Plan found in the Materials Section in Week #4 .
(2). Completely answer the questions at the bottom of the Team Strategy Plan. Each answer should be at least 100+ words in length.
Part II: Conflict Management Plan
While developing the teams, the management group finds that there is currently some internal conflict among two of the employees chosen for this project. Aimee Samus has spoken to his current manager twice regarding his feelings that Nikki McGill is intentionally creating problems on the production line, which is causing Aimee to miss his quality checks. Nikki insists that he has no idea what Aimee is referring to and does not understand why Aimee is trying to cause problem. Nikki now goes to his own superintendent because he feels Aimee is spreading rumors that he is looking for other work. Aimee advises his own manager that he is not sure why Nikki thinks this because he has never said anything like that.
Before the new teams are formed, the management group knows they must resolve this issue so that the new production teams can operate smoothly. Both Nikki and Aimee are good employees with positive performance reviews, and they were chosen for the new project because of this reason.Team Strategy Plan
You are part of a group of newly hired team superintendents with Riordan Manufacturing. Your group was hired to lead new teams and begin production of the newly designed CardiCare Valve heart valves. This will be at the organization’s Pontiac, MI, location that is currently manufacturing custom plastic parts. Many of the production employees are current employees from other divisions, and the company expects to hire some new employees.
Resources: Riordan Manufacturing Virtual Organization, and University of Phoenix Material: Team Strategy Plan found on the student website.
To find the Virtual Organization go to Materials section and then under Course Outline you will find Virtual Organization Link. At the top of the website you will see Business, Education, Healthcare, etc. Select Business then in the drop down select Riordan. In the upper right corner select Intranet. You will then find all the necessary areas: Demographics, Employees etc.
Review the Riordan Manufacturing intranet site and the Human Resource section under Demographics, Employees, Employee Files, and Reports.
(1). Prepare a plan to create the teams and fill out the Team Strategy Plan found in the Materials Section in Week #4 .
(2). Completely answer the questions at the bottom of the Team Strategy Plan. Each answer should be at least 100+ words in length.
Part II: Conflict Management Plan
While developing the teams, the management group finds that there is currently some internal conflict among two of the employees chosen for this project. Aimee Samus has spoken to his current manager twice regarding his feelings that Nikki McGill is intentionally creating problems on the production line, which is causing Aimee to miss his quality checks. Nikki insists that he has no idea what Aimee is referring to and does not understand why Aimee is trying to cause problem. Nikki now goes to his own superintendent because he feels Aimee is spreading rumors that he is looking for other work. Aimee advises his own manager that he is not sure why Nikki thinks this because he has never said anything like that.
Before the new teams are formed, the management group knows they must resolve this issue so that the new production teams can operate smoothly. Both Nikki and Aimee are good employees with positive performance reviews, and they were chosen for the new project because of this reason.

Letters of advice

Letters of advice
Instructions
Choose at least five (5) of the twelve (12) course learning outcomes below to help guide your letter: For each of the five learning outcomes that you use, create a separate section with a heading that reflects the learning outcome that you are using.
1. Explain the principles and misconceptions in effective interpersonal communications.
2. Identify the barriers to effective interpersonal interactions.
3. Describe the process by which self-concept is developed and maintained.
4. Assess their personal communications and improve their communication competencies.
5. Develop strategies for active, critical, and empathic listening.
6. Recognize how words have the power to create and affect attitudes, behavior, and perception.
7. Understand how perceptions, emotions, and nonverbal expression affect interpersonal relationships.
8. Define emotional intelligence and its role in effective interpersonal relationships.
9. Evaluate appropriate levels of self-disclosure in relationships.
10. Describe strategies for managing interpersonal conflicts.
11. Recognize how self-concept and defensive and supportive messages and behaviors create positive and negative communication climates.
12. Understand the impact of gender and culture on interpersonal communications.
Write an eight to ten page paper (excluding title and reference pages) in the form of a letter. In this paper, address at least five concepts (choose the concepts that you feel are most important to successful communication within interpersonal relationships). Your advice cannot be based on your own opinions; you must back up your advice with research, which may include readings from this course or from outside sources. In total, your paper must include at least five (5) sources, including at least two (2) from the Ashford University Library. This is a formal paper and should utilize proper grammar, complete sentences, appropriate paragraphs, and correct citations/references in proper APA (6th edition) style. However, you will write this paper in the format of a letter to the newly-engaged couple, and may address the couple throughout the paper. For example: “Dear Sara and Tim, my advice to you for a successful relationship is…” Along with explaining concepts and including research, you may also use your personal experiences as examples of the research and advice that you are offering.
The paper must be formatted according to APA style. Cite your resources in text and on the reference page. For information regarding APA samples and tutorials, visit the Ashford Writing Center, within the Learning Resources tab on the left navigation toolbar.
Must be eight to ten double-spaced pages in length, and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
Must include a title page with the following:
Title of paper
Student’s name
Course name and number
Instructor’s name
Date submitted
Must begin with an introductory paragraph that has a succinct thesis statement.
Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought.
Must end with a conclusion that reaffirms your thesis.
Must use at least five (5) scholarly sources, including a minimum of two (2) from the Ashford University Library.
Must document all sources (both within the text and on a separate reference page) in APA style, as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
Must include a separate reference page, formatted according to APA style as outlined in the
Ashford Writing Center.
Sole, K. (2011).Making connections: Understanding interpersonal communication. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.

Total customer experience

Total customer experience
Assignment Question:
In today’s increasingly competitive market environment, ‘The Total Customer Experience’ remains as one domain where marketing strategies and actions can secure a sustainable business future through effective brand positioning that is supported by relevant marketing value based deliverables.
With reference to this statement, select an organisation where significant improvements can be made to the total customer experience and then show where and how justified changes can be made.
Attention should be given to:
1. The adoption of the marketing concept as a working business culture.
(What is marketing communication, How well has your marketing department has adapted. I it a market oriented firm?)
2. Understanding Customers and Segmenting Customers.
(Do they understand customers, B”B, B2C, org. Behaviour, give examples of improving segmentation, positioning etc.)
3. Analysing Needs, Wants, Values and Expectations of Customers.
(Consumer Buying Behaviour, Do they strike to improve the change , needs and wants of customers.)
4. Creating Customer-based Value Propositions for Customer Segments
(Do they really understand their needs they change all the time. Create customer based proposition. Price for each segment. E.G. Blockbuster didn’t once they were successful but then stayed in Cashcow, The world changed. PLC moved on but they didn’t.
5. Managing the Customer Experience through Relationship Marketing & Customer Care.
(Do they have loyalty card systems, Customer data base loyalty programme, customer relationship form, long-term relationship customer care programme.)
6. Reinforcing the Organisation’s Identity (or Brands) through changes to the Marketing Mix Variables.
(Branding, what does this meanto ppl. Does it have an image. Brand propostion is it clear, vision and values.
7. Research Requirements for the Organisation to track the Total Customer Experience.
(Do they use Research Marketing. How is the total customer experience).
8. The Outcomes from becoming more Customer Centric
• For each of the above areas, the existing position should be stated and then desired position be projected so that the MBA student has clarity about where the organisation is now and where it needs to be to achieve relevance in a highly competitive market environment.
• The purpose of the discussion paper is for the marketing team to reflect, discuss and agree on agenda of items for change.
Marking Criteria
The discussion paper will contribute 3600 words and 80% of the marks, allocated equally between the above 8 parts, 20% of marks and 400 words will be devoted to:
1. A research plan to show how the assignment was tackled.
2. Evidence Sources and Literature used as a basis for the discussion document.
Assessment Requirements:
• The submission of your work assessment should be organized and clearly structured in a report format.
• Maximum word length allowed is 4000 words, excluding words in charts & tables and in the appendixes section of your assignment.
• This assignment is worth 100% of the final assessment of the module.
• Student is required to submit a type-written document in Microsoft Word format with Times New Roman font type, size 12 and line spacing 1.5.
• Indicate the sources of information and literature review by including all the necessary citations and references adopting the Harvard Referencing System.
• Students who have been found to have committed acts of Plagiarism are automatically considered to have failed the entire module. If found to have breached the regulation for the second time, you will be asked to leave the course.
• Plagiarism involves taking someone else’s words, thoughts, ideas or essays from online essay banks and trying to pass them off as your own. It is a form of cheating which is taken very seriously.
Report Structure
Title Page
Table of Contents
Abstract
Introduction
Question 1
Question 2
Question 3
Question 4
Question 5
Question 6
Question 7
Question 8
Conclusions
References
Research Plan
Literature Evidence
Notes on Plagiarism & Harvard Referencing
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is passing off the work of others as your own. This constitutes academic theft and is a serious matter which is penalized in assignment marking.
Plagiarism is the submission of an item of assessment containing elements of work produced by another person(s) in such a way that it could be assumed to be the student’s own work. Examples of plagiarism are:
• The verbatim copying of another person’s work without acknowledgement
• The close paraphrasing of another person’s work by simply changing a few words or altering the order of presentation without acknowledgement
• The unacknowledged quotation of phrases from another person’s work and/or the presentation of another person’s idea(s) as one’s own.
Copying or close paraphrasing with occasional acknowledgement of the source may also be deemed to be plagiarism is the absence of quotation marks implies that the phraseology is the student’s own.
Plagiarised work may belong to another student or be from a published source such as a book, report, journal or material available on the internet.
Harvard Referencing
The structure of a citation under the Harvard referencing system is the author’s surname, year of publication, and page number or range, in parentheses, as illustrated in the Smith example near the top of this article.
• The page number or page range is omitted if the entire work is cited. The author’s surname is omitted if it appears in the text. Thus we may say: “Jones (2001) revolutionized the field of trauma surgery.”
• Two or three authors are cited using “and” or “&”: (Deane, Smith, and Jones, 1991) or (Deane, Smith & Jones, 1991). More than three authors are cited using et al. (Deane et al. 1992).
• An unknown date is cited as no date (Deane n.d.). A reference to a reprint is cited with the original publication date in square brackets (Marx [1867] 1967, p. 90).
• If an author published two books in 2005, the year of the first (in the alphabetic order of the references) is cited and referenced as 2005a, the second as 2005b.
• A citation is placed wherever appropriate in or after the sentence. If it is at the end of a sentence, it is placed before the period, but a citation for an entire block quote immediately follows the period at the end of the block since the citation is not an actual part of the quotation itself.
• Complete citations are provided in alphabetical order in a section following the text, usually designated as “Works cited” or “References”. The difference between a “works cited” or “references” list and a bibliography is that a bibliography may include works not directly cited in the text.
• All citations are in the same font as the main text.
Examples
Examples of book references are:
• Smith, J. (2005a). Dutch Citing Practices. The Hague: Holland Research Foundation.
• Smith, J. (2005b). Harvard Referencing. London: Jolly Good Publishing.
In giving the city of publication, an internationally well-known city (such as London, The Hague, or New York) is referenced as the city alone. If the city is not internationally well known, the country (or state and country if in the U.S.) are given.
Examples of journal references are:
• Smith, John Maynard. “The origin of altruism,” Nature 393, 1998, pp. 639-40.
• Bowcott, Owen. “Street Protest”, The Guardian, October 18, 2005, accessed February 7, 2006.

Total customer experience

Total customer experience
Assignment Question:
In today’s increasingly competitive market environment, ‘The Total Customer Experience’ remains as one domain where marketing strategies and actions can secure a sustainable business future through effective brand positioning that is supported by relevant marketing value based deliverables.
With reference to this statement, select an organisation where significant improvements can be made to the total customer experience and then show where and how justified changes can be made.
Attention should be given to:
1. The adoption of the marketing concept as a working business culture.
(What is marketing communication, How well has your marketing department has adapted. I it a market oriented firm?)
2. Understanding Customers and Segmenting Customers.
(Do they understand customers, B”B, B2C, org. Behaviour, give examples of improving segmentation, positioning etc.)
3. Analysing Needs, Wants, Values and Expectations of Customers.
(Consumer Buying Behaviour, Do they strike to improve the change , needs and wants of customers.)
4. Creating Customer-based Value Propositions for Customer Segments
(Do they really understand their needs they change all the time. Create customer based proposition. Price for each segment. E.G. Blockbuster didn’t once they were successful but then stayed in Cashcow, The world changed. PLC moved on but they didn’t.
5. Managing the Customer Experience through Relationship Marketing & Customer Care.
(Do they have loyalty card systems, Customer data base loyalty programme, customer relationship form, long-term relationship customer care programme.)
6. Reinforcing the Organisation’s Identity (or Brands) through changes to the Marketing Mix Variables.
(Branding, what does this meanto ppl. Does it have an image. Brand propostion is it clear, vision and values.
7. Research Requirements for the Organisation to track the Total Customer Experience.
(Do they use Research Marketing. How is the total customer experience).
8. The Outcomes from becoming more Customer Centric
• For each of the above areas, the existing position should be stated and then desired position be projected so that the MBA student has clarity about where the organisation is now and where it needs to be to achieve relevance in a highly competitive market environment.
• The purpose of the discussion paper is for the marketing team to reflect, discuss and agree on agenda of items for change.
Marking Criteria
The discussion paper will contribute 3600 words and 80% of the marks, allocated equally between the above 8 parts, 20% of marks and 400 words will be devoted to:
1. A research plan to show how the assignment was tackled.
2. Evidence Sources and Literature used as a basis for the discussion document.
Assessment Requirements:
• The submission of your work assessment should be organized and clearly structured in a report format.
• Maximum word length allowed is 4000 words, excluding words in charts & tables and in the appendixes section of your assignment.
• This assignment is worth 100% of the final assessment of the module.
• Student is required to submit a type-written document in Microsoft Word format with Times New Roman font type, size 12 and line spacing 1.5.
• Indicate the sources of information and literature review by including all the necessary citations and references adopting the Harvard Referencing System.
• Students who have been found to have committed acts of Plagiarism are automatically considered to have failed the entire module. If found to have breached the regulation for the second time, you will be asked to leave the course.
• Plagiarism involves taking someone else’s words, thoughts, ideas or essays from online essay banks and trying to pass them off as your own. It is a form of cheating which is taken very seriously.
Report Structure
Title Page
Table of Contents
Abstract
Introduction
Question 1
Question 2
Question 3
Question 4
Question 5
Question 6
Question 7
Question 8
Conclusions
References
Research Plan
Literature Evidence
Notes on Plagiarism & Harvard Referencing
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is passing off the work of others as your own. This constitutes academic theft and is a serious matter which is penalized in assignment marking.
Plagiarism is the submission of an item of assessment containing elements of work produced by another person(s) in such a way that it could be assumed to be the student’s own work. Examples of plagiarism are:
• The verbatim copying of another person’s work without acknowledgement
• The close paraphrasing of another person’s work by simply changing a few words or altering the order of presentation without acknowledgement
• The unacknowledged quotation of phrases from another person’s work and/or the presentation of another person’s idea(s) as one’s own.
Copying or close paraphrasing with occasional acknowledgement of the source may also be deemed to be plagiarism is the absence of quotation marks implies that the phraseology is the student’s own.
Plagiarised work may belong to another student or be from a published source such as a book, report, journal or material available on the internet.
Harvard Referencing
The structure of a citation under the Harvard referencing system is the author’s surname, year of publication, and page number or range, in parentheses, as illustrated in the Smith example near the top of this article.
• The page number or page range is omitted if the entire work is cited. The author’s surname is omitted if it appears in the text. Thus we may say: “Jones (2001) revolutionized the field of trauma surgery.”
• Two or three authors are cited using “and” or “&”: (Deane, Smith, and Jones, 1991) or (Deane, Smith & Jones, 1991). More than three authors are cited using et al. (Deane et al. 1992).
• An unknown date is cited as no date (Deane n.d.). A reference to a reprint is cited with the original publication date in square brackets (Marx [1867] 1967, p. 90).
• If an author published two books in 2005, the year of the first (in the alphabetic order of the references) is cited and referenced as 2005a, the second as 2005b.
• A citation is placed wherever appropriate in or after the sentence. If it is at the end of a sentence, it is placed before the period, but a citation for an entire block quote immediately follows the period at the end of the block since the citation is not an actual part of the quotation itself.
• Complete citations are provided in alphabetical order in a section following the text, usually designated as “Works cited” or “References”. The difference between a “works cited” or “references” list and a bibliography is that a bibliography may include works not directly cited in the text.
• All citations are in the same font as the main text.
Examples
Examples of book references are:
• Smith, J. (2005a). Dutch Citing Practices. The Hague: Holland Research Foundation.
• Smith, J. (2005b). Harvard Referencing. London: Jolly Good Publishing.
In giving the city of publication, an internationally well-known city (such as London, The Hague, or New York) is referenced as the city alone. If the city is not internationally well known, the country (or state and country if in the U.S.) are given.
Examples of journal references are:
• Smith, John Maynard. “The origin of altruism,” Nature 393, 1998, pp. 639-40.
• Bowcott, Owen. “Street Protest”, The Guardian, October 18, 2005, accessed February 7, 2006.

The Racial Laws in Italy during WW2

The Racial Laws in Italy during WW2
In strengthening Italy’s bond with Nazi Germany Mussolini, in September 1938, passed The Racial Laws against the Jews, barring them from studying or teaching in a school of higher learning and revoking the citizenship of all foreign Jews obtained after January, 1919, and decreeing their expulsion within six months. In November, further discriminatory legislation were passed, including the prohibition of marriages between Jews and Aryans and the exclusion of Jews from military and civil administrative positions. The Manifesto, which was closely modeled on the Nazi Nuremberg laws, laid the foundations for Mussolini’s racial policies.
Some historians have tried to absolve Italians from their role in the Holocaust, explaining that while Italy did institute racial laws, the extermination campaign was strictly a German invention. Those historians fail to take account of the impact of Italy’s 1938 racial laws, which instituted harsher restrictions than Germany’s first anti-Semitic legislation. Historian Meir Michaelis wrote in “Mussolini and the Jews,” that although Mussolini “was too much of an Italian to approve of the ‘final solution,’ . . . he and his henchmen helped to create the conditions in which the Holocaust became possible.” While Mussolini did not put Italian forces to work to implement the “Final Solution,” he had legally isolated Italian Jews to strengthen the Rome-Berlin axis. When considering the record of the Italian people, it is important to remember that Mussolini was a popular leader and fascism was a popular movement. When the racial laws were passed, the most common reaction among Italians was one of indifference, not outrage.
That said, the racial campaign also failed to sway most Italians to anti-Semitism. While the most assimilated Jewish community in Europe was betrayed by its government, it found that many Italians remembered their past service to the nation, viewed them as no different than their Catholic neighbors, and stood by their Jewish countrymen.
It is, therefore, my premise that while some of the racial laws were indeed harsher than those in Germany there was a serious lack of desire to enforce these laws by the Italian populace and authority. To what extent is it fair to argue that Italy implemented antisemitic legislation–especially in a comparative context with Germany’s application of similar legislation?
Calling on the scholarship listed below, and without absolving Italy of its national responsibility for collaboration with the Nazi regime, in this paper I will argue that Italy should not be perceived as having practiced the discrimination it articulated on paper.
SOURCES
• Meir Michaelis, Mussolini and the Jews
• Article by Liliana Picciotto; http://www.primolevicenter.org/Essays%26Interviews/Entries/2012/8/13_The_Vatican_and_the_Anti-Jewish_Persecution_in_Italy_through_Diplomatic_Documents_of_the_Holy_See.html
• Iael Orvieto’s “Letters to Mussolini: Italian Jews and the Racial Laws” in Remember for the future; The Holocaust in an Age of Genocide,
• “Italians Jews Facing Racial Laws: Appeal to Mussolini as a Wayy of Coping in Yalkut Moreshet (vol 72, April 2002)
• De Felice, Renzo. The Jews in Fascist Italy: A History. New York: Enigma Books, 2001.
• Sarfatti, Michele. The Jews in Mussolini’s Italy: From Equality to Persecution. George L. Mosse series in modern European cultural and intellectual history. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2006.
• Zuccotti, Susan. The Italians and the Holocaust: Persecution, Rescue, and Survival. New York: Basic Books, 1987.
• Jews in Italy Under Fascist and Nazi Rule, 1922-1945 edited by Joshua D. Zimmerman
THIS PAPER NEEDS TO USE THE CHICAGO STYLE OF REFERENCING
Here is a link to the only acceptable style of referencing: http://www.ucd.ie/t4cms/Guide68.pdf

How effective was the Freedmen’s Bureau

How effective was the Freedmen’s Bureau
How successful was it in assisting ex-slaves to live in freedom?
The long essay would be a traditional essay that typically five paragraphs long. The first paragraph should introduce the topic and state the student’s position / answer to the question. It should contain between three-five (3-5) complete sentences, including the thesis statement for the essay. The second, third, and fourth paragraphs are the body paragraphs. Each body paragraph should contain between three-five (3-5) sentences, including the topic sentence (first sentence of the body paragraph, states a main point that supports the thesis) and at least two-three (2-3) specific examples per main point. The fifth and final paragraph should begin with a restatement of the thesis. It should be three-five (3-5) complete sentences, and include a brief summary/conclusion of the student’s answer to the essay question. It is essential, particularly in the survey courses, for students to provide cites and footnotes for their work in untimed exams. Citations must adhere to the Chicago Style format but perfection is not expected. An example of common citations are included on pages four and five of this edition

How did enslaved Africans and African Americans preserve a sense of their own community

How did enslaved Africans and African Americans preserve a sense of their own community
The long essay would be a traditional essay that typically five paragraphs long. The first paragraph should introduce the topic and state the student’s position / answer to the question. It should contain between three-five (3-5) complete sentences, including the thesis statement for the essay. The second, third, and fourth paragraphs are the body paragraphs. Each body paragraph should contain between three-five (3-5) sentences, including the topic sentence (first sentence of the body paragraph, states a main point that supports the thesis) and at least two-three (2-3) specific examples per main point. The fifth and final paragraph should begin with a restatement of the thesis. It should be three-five (3-5) complete sentences, and include a brief summary/conclusion of the student’s answer to the essay question. It is essential, particularly in the survey courses, for students to provide cites and footnotes for their work in untimed exams. Citations must adhere to the Chicago Style format but perfection is not expected. An example of common citations are included on pages four and five of this edition.